Adventures with Atticus: A Horse of a Different Color

When Atticus came to us in July he was a light rusty color, but as winter approaches, he has become a horse of a different color. Not only has his winter coat added a deeper hue, but his mane has really grown out from its previous roaching, and Atticus looks like an equine rock star with his mohawk mane.

It seems the darker shade of his hair has also brought out a slightly more somber attitude in my sweet boy. After accompanying Hubby on a hunting trip in Colorado, Atticus came back without the willingness to ride. Of course, I was greatly concerned. Hubby told me that twice Atticus stopped when they were riding up the mountain and simply would not go. Hubby had to get off and lead him. (This defeated the purpose of taking a horse to the mountains and did not bode will with the hunting party.) When I attempted to ride him on the farm, Atticus calmly allowed me to groom and saddle him but would NOT budge once I was in the saddle.

Atticus checking Winn-Dixie out.

No amount of kissing, clicking, or kicking could get him to go. We even tried baiting him by separating him from his girlfriend Winn-Dixie. Atticus couldn’t have cared less that my daughter rode Winn-Dixie out of the corral and out of sight. I hopped off, did some ground work with him, jumped back on, and still no steps would he take. I led him to the top of the pasture meeting up with my patiently waiting daughter and Winn-Dixie. Back in the saddle I went, but nowhere was Atticus willing to walk. Eventually, we ponied him back to the corral with Winn-Dixie.

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Dolly Parton, will you have lunch with me? – Sincerely, Intentergy

Dear Dolly Parton,

I am writing to invite you to join me for lunch when it’s convenient for you, of course.

I write a positivity blog in Central Missouri, and without a doubt, you are one of the most inspiring individuals I can think of. Lunch with you would fulfill a great need I have for finding sources of positive influence to share with others. There are so many questions I would love to ask you and stories I think you would enjoy about how your music and words have aided in shaping my life and others I know.

“9 to 5” is my favorite song to sing with my kids. They love you because I have played your music for them since before they were born. There is not a happier sound than their sweet voices ringing out with, “Tumble out of bed and stumble to the kitchen…”

“Coat of Many Colors” is a song I am ashamed to admit that I often struggle to listen to all the way because it is a story that I can relate to well and the raw beauty of its tale rings true in the Lord’s calling to take pride in all we have and the messages founded in the Good Book.

To break up with me, my first boyfriend simply left a message to listen to “I Will Always Love You” and then a quick good-bye. While I know you sweetly wrote that song for Porter Wagoner, it was a bittersweet song for my 16-year-old self. However, it is one that has served in so many arenas for so many people. The fact that you wrote it is proof that you are a source of true inspiration and powerful influence. An influence that I would love to tap into.

Not only has your music touched me, but your generous efforts in the aftermath of the terrible fires that swept through the mountains of Tennessee and the tremendous ways you aid education are fuel for finding greater ways to serve others.

Your humor and honesty are so refreshing. Your laughter, I am certain, is a sound that makes even the angels rejoice. Honesty, humor, and laughter are all things I encourage in my daily encounters and writing. Please give me a chance to experience your contributions first hand.

This letter is the first of a series I plan to write to those I find inspiring. As I respect, admire, and aspire to be like you, there was no doubt that you HAD to be my first lunch invite!

Thank you for your time and consideration. You are truly one of my heroes.

All my best,
Melanie A. Peters
Intentergy’s Source
http://www.intentergy.com
Email: intentergynow@gmail.com

P.S. When I sat in RCA Studio B and sang on the Grand Ole Opry stage, it wasn’t Elvis’ spirit I tried to conjure. It was Dolly Parton’s.