National Broadcast Anxiety

Photo by Negative Space on Pexels.com

Every hour on the hour.
Breaking, late-breaking, exclusive.
National Broadcast Anxiety is produced at the speed of sound and sight.
Our eyes, ears, minds, and hearts cannot escape.
Tonight’s segment on how to handle media-based stress
made it that much worse.

We can’t trust the “honesty” of journalism because they feed on
National Broadcast Anxiety.
Coming at you from every angle,
but the only angle they want you believe is theirs.
Loving our nation for what is it can’t be allowed.
Only one side or the other can be accepted.
They refuse to compromise…

Photo by Daria Sannikova on Pexels.com

The only ideals that do not deserve to be compromised
Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness are excluded by National Broadcast Anxiety.
Apparently, if their side is not happy then no one can be happy.
The only pursuit is to divide.
Liberty loses life when the desires of a radical few strip the American dream from those who are willing to work for it.
Working for it isn’t enough. Speaking up is not accepted.
Suffer in silence because standing up for yourself is considered prejudice.
Be careful! You’ll end up on the NEWS.

Photo by Terje Sollie on Pexels.com

N.E.W.S. – Directions that fail to lead anywhere but
National Broadcast Anxiety.
It’s time to change more than the channel.
“Journalists,” listen.
You are not speaking for America. You are speaking for ratings.
State facts. Take out the loaded adjectives and labels. Tell the stories of what’s working.
Use your avenues for advancement beyond that of overpaid officials and their tantrums.
Share the problem-solvers. Mute the warmongers. Produce something positive.
We don’t need any more seasons of National Broadcast Anxiety.

By: Melanie A. Peters

P.S. If we are ever going to find peace amongst ourselves, we must change the channels of journalism today.

I Miss Paul Harvey

Paul Harvey 2

While radio never stops and has played a pivotal role in entertainment for centuries, it does not seem to command the attention of every waking hour as it did in the past. When I was growing up, my waking hours started around 4:00 a.m. helping milk cows. Each of those mornings we were joined in the milk barn by the sounds and stories of Paul Harvey. Even after we left the farm in 1994, my listening continued as I began waitressing breakfast at a local restaurant. It didn’t matter where I was, Paul Harvey’s voice drew me in and transported my mind to the stories and people of whom he spoke.

Monday through Friday Mr. Harvey shared his commentary on the affairs of the world in his News and Comment. At the end of each weekday broadcast he would sign off with a chipper, “Good day.” On Saturdays he shared The Rest of the Story. After telling an always impactful version of one adventure, discovery, or invention, The Rest of the Story was always smartly summarized with, “And that’s the rest of the story.” The reliability of his demeanor made him more than a voice on the radio. He became someone I felt I knew. He became someone who was an active part of my life. He was like family. Continue reading “I Miss Paul Harvey”