Catching Luck

Clammy

The last thing my daughter expected to catch out of Grandma’s pond was this mussel.

Sunday was a beautiful evening and the kids requested to fish in Grandma’s pond. What the heck, we weren’t doing anything else. Popo dug up a few worms, my three little anglers grabbed some poles, and we were off the pond bank.

Our youngest chose a Lightening McQueen fishing pole. My older son chose a tried-and-true Zebco. My daughter chose Grandma’s very nice and expensive Shakespeare pole because it was guaranteed to catch the biggest fish (at least according to my daughter).

After just a few minutes, both boys had reeled in some nice, little blue gill and bass. In spite of her desperate desire to catch a fish, my little girl went without a bite for quite some time.

Suddenly, she yelled, “There’s something on my hook. It’s really heavy.” Clearly there was something on her line because she was struggling to bring it in, but there didn’t seem to be any fight in the water.

Continue reading “Catching Luck”

Lord, I hope this day is good

Lord I Hope This Day is Good

Asking for a “good” day is not uncommon, heck, it’s really not too much to ask anytime.

When David Hanner wrote this song, he put the daily prayers of millions to music. When Don Williams sang this song, he brought those prayers to life. Since its first recording, the song, “Lord, I Hope This Day is Good,” has been sung by many, including LeeAnn Womack.

I enjoy hearing this song anytime, but I love Don Williams’ version best. His vocal inflections of a grateful, but somewhat down-trodden man are so in tune with how many of my days go.

My favorite line in the whole song though is, “I don’t need fortune and I don’t need fame. Send down the thunder, Lord, send down the rain, but when you’re plannin’ just how it will be, plan a good day for me” 

I can take a rumble of proverbial thunder in my day. Rain is a good thing (Right, Luke Bryan?) The words accurately reflect the simple request that my efforts and adventures make for a good day.

With this song and theme in mind, I encourage you to set a simple intent in your day. Look for the good in all that is around you. Remember it’s not about fortune or fame. It’s not about how righteous you can be. It is hard to feel forgotten and lonely, but so long as you understand that what you do and who you are is special, your day will always be good.

By: Melanie A. Peters

P.S. I have found this song most helpful in the morning when my children don’t want to go to school. 🙂

 

Childhood Chores

chores.jpg

My childhood chores involved babysitting, folding laundry, doing dishes, baling hay, milking cows, and whatever else my parents needed.

We no longer milk cows. My kids are too small to bale hay (and we no longer square bale anything). Many of the jobs that were considered okay for my generation and generations previous are considered unsafe for children to do today.

The thing that is most unnerving to me is not that chores are unsafe, but rather the fact that we are raising future citizens who don’t know how to fold their own shirts.

Recently, I overheard two women talking about their teenage children. They were childhood chore funnydiscussing the fact that they don’t let their kids do the laundry. The reasoning for this was that they didn’t have the patience to teach their children how to use the washing machine and that the kids never folded the clothes the way they (the moms) like it.

Okay?!?

png 1 If we don’t demonstrate patience for our children, how will they know what the skill of being patient looks like? If we don’t teach them how to use the washing machine, who will? Some nice lady at the laundry mat?

png 1 Secondly, how can our children improve their skills, in things like laundry folding, if we don’t guide them? I don’t mind if my shirts are a bit sloppy when folded, at least somebody folded them.

Another time a mom told me she didn’t know how I had the patience to let my kids cook with me. “They are so messy, and I am already tired when I get home. I don’t want them underfoot when I am trying to get dinner on the table,” was what she told me.

png 1 Cooking is messy. Learning is messy. Kids are messy. The cool thing about cooking childhood chores (2)with my kids is that they are learning. They learn how to make food. They learn how to clean up. They learn how to work as a team preparing, making, and serving our meals. Plus, my time with them is so precious in the evenings; it is nice to be able to do something productive.

I am not gonna lie. We don’t cook together every night. I don’t let my kids put the clothes away all the time. Sometimes I am too tired to be patient with them and sometimes they are too tired to work with me. But we still try most of the time. Continue reading “Childhood Chores”

Happy Haiku Day!

Haiku Day

A decade ago I began celebrating Haiku Day on May 7th with my students because it is 5-7. Haikus are traditional Japanese poetry that follows a 5-7-5 syllable pattern and are usually about nature.

Luckily the other educators at my school embraced my enthusiasm and encouraged the composition of haikus in their classrooms as well.

Today I am sharing this celebration with you.

Take time to pen a haiku for yourself and document the beauty of something in your life.

Sharing our writing
Brings life to our word and thoughts 
Happy Haiku Day!

By: Melanie A. Peters

P.S.
Share Intentergy
Your positive energy
Adds to your intent
  

 

Hatching Dinosaurs

Hatching Dinosaurs

Hatching dinos

For Easter my son received a dino egg from his godparents. Within minutes of receiving the egg, it was in a bucket of water and surrounded by eight anxious children.

This particular egg was one that advertised to hatch within 12-24 hours so long as it remained fully covered in water. The directions advised to keep the water temperature below 99 degrees and above 32 degrees. No problem, right?

Well, the dinosaur hatched within the 24 hour time period (with only a little help from the kids) 😉

It was a beautiful triceratops. My son named her Peaches because of her peachy tone. She was our newest prized possession. Once the kids could no longer stand the torture of watching her grow in the bucket of water, out she came. (The directions suggested leaving the dinosaur in water for up to 36 hours for full growth.)

When we traveled to my grandmother’s to celebrate Easter, Peaches came along for the ride. Everything was great until it was time to hunt Easter eggs. As I stood up, my foot struck something under my chair and water sloshed onto the floor. What the heck?

I looked in the plastic bucket and saw what looked like Peaches, but not really. When I touched “Peaches,” she disintegrated between my fingers. It was really, really gross. The water was hot and the dinosaur was not. Continue reading “Hatching Dinosaurs”

Danger flows – Thoughtful Thursday Poem

Danger Flows – Thoughtful Thursday Poem via Photo Challenge: Danger!

Danger flows

Recently rocks could be seen and blades of grass reached for the sky
Now they are hidden beneath remnants of storms.
Murky brown, stagnant waters have filled indentations in the land,
puddling the roads and lawns.
Foaming heads roar over the creek banks.
Rivers are too swollen to assuage their growing pains.
Do not feed the flooding streams with your bravery.
Within those stormy remnants flows danger.

By: Melanie A. Peters

 

The Joy of Overthinking – Wise Words Wednesday

The Joy of Overthinking – Wise Words Wednesday

Joy of Overthinking

Photo credit: bluntcard.com

What is the joy in overthinking?

Worry, overthinking, and stewing over things we cannot control; these are all bad habits. I am guilty of doing all of these. It stinks. There is no joy in overthinking.

There is no joy in guilt.

There is no joy in worry.

There is no joy in stewing over things we cannot control.

Recently, my husband asked, “So why are so worried about it?” (I really should not have been worried about the situation.) My genius reply went something like this, “Because I want to.”

The question I should have been asking myself was, “What joy comes from worrying about this?”

The answer would have been simple. “None.”

If there is something in your life that you cannot control or guilt that you feel for the actions of others, ask yourself, “What joy comes from worrying about this?” Continue reading “The Joy of Overthinking – Wise Words Wednesday”

Fairy Garden Dreams Become Reality (pixie dust not required)

Fairy Garden Dreams Become Reality (pixie dust not required)

fairy garden love

Three years ago my children saw the Tinkerbell movie and began planning to make a fairy garden. Well, this year we finally made it happen!

This is one of those magical projects that brought my kids and I together in a successful collaboration of creativity.

The local dollar store provided adorable and affordable garden decor and my good friends at Dudenhoeffer’s Countryside Gardens offered the sweetest little plants for our flowery festivities.

Even though each of my children started out with roughly the same tools and supplies, fairy garden girlthey each created a unique and whimsical fairy garden. The garden of each child was an terrific representation of their personalities.

There were two things that I really loved about this project.

  1. My kids played in the dirt and made something cool. It doesn’t get any better than that!
  2. I was able to witness my children’s imagination at work. There is nothing more inspiring and motivating than pure, childlike awe and excitement. I honestly wish I had made a garden for myself. Tapping into that innocence and creativity would do anyone’s heart some good.

fairie garden 2

While we know fairies aren’t real, it is important to remember that nurturing the ideas and wishes of our children is a very real and necessary element of life. Providing opportunities to dream and create is something that benefits all of us.

The fairy gardens are beautifully displayed along our front walk. They bring smiles to the faces of everyone who comes to our home and provide a tremendous sense of pride for my children. I have caught each of them peeking at their gardens wondering if the fairies had visited. Their awe and wonder is so sweet.

I encourage you to take time to create something with those you love. Share your dreams and imagine together. You don’t have to build a garden to create something that lasts. The longest lasting part might be the memories you make, but those memories are magical. They can appear anytime you choose.

Believe in the magic of time spent together. Allow yourself to be inspired by the imagination that is shared. Put your intent into building energy that grows love and memories. It doesn’t require more than a little faith and trust (pixie dust not required.)

By: Melanie A. Peters

P.S. I really do want to make my own fairy garden someday.