Turkey 30 Ways – Part #3 (From the Farmer’s Table)

As I made my way through the recipe box, I wanted to share a variety of recipes that would appeal to diverse tastes and cooking abilities. These last 10 recipes range from appetizers to Thanksgiving centerpieces, but all are dishes that showcase turkey and its versatility.

21st Way: Turkey and Vegetable Tetrazzini

Turkey and Vegetable Tetrazzini

Ingredients: 16 oz. linguine pasta, 2 Tblsp vegetable oil, 1 lb. turkey breast cut into 1″ pieces or shredded, 2 cups broccoli chopped, 2 cups carrots sliced, 2 cups mushrooms sliced, 2/3 cup milk, 1 can cream of chicken soup, 1/3 cup parmesan cheese, salt and pepper to taste

Steps:

  1. Cook linguine according to directions on package.
  2. Heat oil and cook turkey until done.
  3. Set turkey to side. Add broccoli, carrots, and mushrooms to pan and cook on medium for 3-5 minutes.
  4. Add milk, cream of chicken soup, parmesan cheese, and turkey. Cook until heated through.
  5. Stir in cooked linguine and cook till hot.

***Left-over baked turkey works great in this recipe.

22nd Way: Turkey Asparagus Risotto

Ingredients: 1 lb turkey shredded or cubed, 1 lb asparagus, 3 cups mushrooms sliced, 1 shallot, 4 cups chicken or turkey broth, 1 cup Arborio rice, 2 Tblsp olive oil, 2 Tblsp butter, 1 cup white wine, 1/2 tsp black pepper, 1/2 tsp Kosher salt

Steps:

  1. Cut asparagus into 2 inch pieces.

2. Sauté the asparagus and mushrooms in non-skillet. Cook just until the vegetables are soft. About 7 minutes. Stir in salt and pepper. Cover and keep warm.

3. In a large pot, heat olive oil and butter over medium heat. Once butter melt adds shallots and cook just until softened.

4. Stir in the Arborio rice and mix until coated in butter. Toast slightly but do not brown.

5. Pour in wine and cook until wine absorbs.

6. Pour one cup of broth over the rice and stir consistently until the liquid is absorbed. Repeat process, one cup at a time, until all liquid is absorbed by the rice.

7. Add the shredded turkey and sautéed vegetables to the risotto, heat through. Mix well. Serve immediately.

***Left-over baked turkey works great in this recipe.

23rd Way: Turkey and Bisquick Dumplings

Ingredients: 2 cups turkey shredded, 2 1/2 cups Bisquick, 2/3 cups milk, flour to roll dough, 6 cups chicken or turkey broth, salt and pepper to taste

Steps:

  1. Mix Bisquick and milk until in tight dough ball.
  2. Coat rolling pin and rolling surface well with flour. Roll dough as thin as possible. Use butter knife or pizza cutter to cut 2 inch dough squares or strips. *Works best if you allow dough to dry out a bit before trying to pick up to place in broth.
  3. Bring broth to boil in a large soup pan.
  4. Add turkey and return broth to a boil.
  5. Gradually add Bisquick dumplings to boiling broth with turkey.
  6. Simmer for 7-10 minutes, stirring often to make sure dumplings are not sticking to bottom of pan.
  7. Salt and pepper to taste. Serve in bowl.

***Left-over baked turkey works great in this recipe.

24th Way: Short Cut Turkey Pot Pie

Ingredients: For filling: 2 1/2 cups cooked turkey shredded or cubed, 2 Tblsp veg oil, 2 cups frozen mixed vegetables, 2 cups pre-made poultry gravy or poultry gravy mix, 1 15 oz can black beans, 1/2 tsp salt, 1 tsp pepper
For crust: 2 1/2 cups Bisquick mix, 2/3 cup milk, flour for rolling crust or use pre-made pie crust

Steps:

  1. Preheat over 350 degrees.
  2. In large skillet heat oil. Cook turkey until done.
  3. Drain and rinse black beans.
  4. Add frozen vegetables and black beans to turkey and set to side.
  5. Heat gravy according to directions on package.
  6. Mix gravy, salt, and pepper into turkey and vegetables.
  7. Mix Bisquick and milk. Once dough is mixed, use rolling pin and flour to roll dough flat enough to cover 9×13 baking dish.
  8. Pour gravy/vegetable/turkey mixture into 9×13 backing dish.
  9. Cover dish with crust and tuck edges around inside lip of pan. Use knife to cut two or three slits in center of crust.
  10. Bake at 350 degrees for 30 minutes or until crust is golden brown.

***Left-over baked turkey works great in this recipe.

25th Way: Fancy Turkey Pot Pie

Ingredients: 2 Tblsp butter, 1 onion chopped, 2 stalks celery chopped, 3 carrots chopped, 4 Tblsp flour, 4 cups chicken or turkey stock, 2 potatoes peeled and diced, 2 cups shredded turkey, 2 Tblsp chopped parsley, 1/2 cup frozen peas thawed, 1 prepared pie crust (*or use Bisquick trick from Shortcut Turkey Pot Pie Recipe), 1 egg lightly beaten

Steps:

  1. Preheat over to 350 degrees.
  2. Melt butter in sauce pan and cook chopped onion until tender.
  3. Stir in celery and carrots and cook for 2 minutes.
  4. Stir in flour and cook for 2 minutes.
  5. Add chicken or turkey stock and bring to a simmer.
  6. Add potatoes and simmer until tender.
  7. Stir in turkey, parsley, and peas.
  8. Pour mixture into 9×13 baking dish.
  9. Top with pie crust and brush with egg.
  10. Bake 30 minutes unit crust is golden.
  11. Remove from over and let set for 5 minutes prior to serving.
Continue reading “Turkey 30 Ways – Part #3 (From the Farmer’s Table)”

When You Feel Broken – Wise Words Wednesday

“In Japan, broken objects are often repaired with gold. The flaw is seen as a unique piece of the object’s history, which adds to its beauty. Consider this when you feel broken.”

Wouldn’t it be great if every time we had a heartache, made a mistake, or lost someone we loved our pain was commemorated in gold? We’d each be a walking Fort Knox.

While I don’t think adding gold to our bodies when we break something is always plausible. I do think there is merit in finding value in our flaws.

When I was in kindergarten, I was in a contest to see who could swing highest the fastest against a girl in my class. I was winning. She was not. She kicked my swing and I landed on my head and suffered a concussion. I spent the night vomiting in the hospital and experiencing my first CAT-scan. (So much for winning that race.) Here I am 35 years out of kindergarten and I still feel that fracture when the weather changes. I know if it’s going to snow or if a big storm is coming. The pressure front splits right down the middle of my cranium. It’s not something that stops me in my tracks, but it is helpful when considering if I should make plans for a snow day or if I should get laundry off the clothesline soon. My cracked cranium is something that I have come to appreciate in times of severe weather. (It may also explain some things about my extreme personality.)

Continue reading “When You Feel Broken – Wise Words Wednesday”

Monday’s Message – December 14, 2020

Hi friends, there’s no video for this week, but I promise to get back in broadcasting mode next week.

Last week I saw a post on Facebook that I thought was worthy of sharing. Originally posted by Tee Kim on November 22, 2020, an image of a Starbucks sign speaks volumes about the fragility that many of us are feeling but aren’t always willing to consider in those we encounter.

I wasn’t alone in appreciating the message of Tee’s post. Since its original publication, the post has been shared over 119,000 times and liked/loved/cared for over 6,500 times. The thing that strikes me the most about this message of kindness is just how many people believe we need to be aware of the situations of others. The tough part is we are supposed to be aware of one another’s fragility while maintaining social distancing, wearing our masks, getting holiday deals, and holding in our own emotional rodeos.

Continue reading “Monday’s Message – December 14, 2020”

Words Can Do Magic – Wise Words Wednesday

I recently had the opportunity to be a substitute teacher for a 1st grade class. (I was probably a bottom-of-the-barrel substitute selection, but that didn’t stop my enthusiasm.) As the library lady at school, I get the distinct privilege of sharing a book with the students once a week, but that Friday I was given two opportunities to read books of my choosing to the class. The only problem was I couldn’t abandon my newly acquired class to run up to the library for reading materials, and the junior high classes were using the space so I couldn’t take the 1st graders to the library. I had to tap into the resources at my disposal and pick books from the numerous reading tubs available in the classroom. That is how I stumbled upon Six Crows by Leo Lionni and the powerful statement, “Words can do magic.”

The Six Crows fable is one where a wise old owl witnesses the great lengths that a farmer and six crows go to in order to protect or steal the farmer’s wheat. After reflecting on the situation, the wise owl couldn’t decide who was being sillier, so she stepped in to help. The owl advised both the farmer and the crows to speak to the other and work out their problem instead of allowing the wheat to die because the two parties were so busy trying to scare the other away. The scare tactics included terrible scarecrows and giant bird puppets; both of which prevented the wheat from being tended or eaten.

Continue reading “Words Can Do Magic – Wise Words Wednesday”

Monday’s Message – December 7, 2020

2020 has been a rough year on most of us. A lot of people want to forget the year ever happened, so I thought I’d give the December 2020 Positivity Challenge a crazy spin. Instead of thinking about a New Year’s resolution for January 2021, I challenge you to make an Old Year’s Resolution.

That’s right, an Old Year’s Resolution!
I challenge you to set a goal or envision yourself taking on a new skill, talent, or outlook for 2020. For the rest of December work harder on helping the year end on a positive note than you normally do on the usual weight loss or decluttering resolutions of new years past.

Take this Old Year’s Resolution seriously!

Think of what you pictured 2020 looking like. Remember the resolutions or goals you set for yourself and grab onto one of those dreams, goals, or ambitions. Work your darndest to make that objective a reality as you wrap up this craziest of years.

Don’t let this be the way you move into a new year.

Here are some examples:

For the next 24 days, cut out the sugars and carbs you have always said you should.

For the next 24 days, send a Thank You text or card to someone for whom you are grateful.

For the next 24 days, work out for 25 minutes while you watch your favorite tv show.

Continue reading “Monday’s Message – December 7, 2020”

Turkey 30 Ways – Part #2 (From the Farmer’s Table)

Here is the 2nd installation of “Turkey 30 Ways.” These are all turkey recipes that my family enjoys and I hope you will too!

11th Way: Sweet Hawaiian Crockpot Turkey

Ingredients: 2 lb. turkey breast chunks, 1 Tblsp olive oil, 1 cup pineapple juice, 1/2 cup brown sugar, 1/3 cup soy sauce

Steps:

  1. Mix pineapple juice, brown sugar, and soy sauce in a bowl.
  2. Heat olive oil in a skillet. Lightly brown turkey in skillet before adding to crockpot.
  3. Place turkey in crockpot and cover with pineapple juice mixture.
  4. Cook on low for 6-8 hours. Serve with warmed rice.

***If the dish looks too soupy, fry turkey and sauce in skillet until sauce is at a light boil. Boil until it thickens.

12th Way: Crock Pot Sweet and Sour Turkey

Ingredients:
For the turkey: 2 lbs. turkey breast cut into chunks, sea salt and black pepper to taste, 1/2 cup cornstarch, 2 large eggs beaten, 1/4 cup olive oil

For the sauce: 1/2 cup brown sugar packed, 1/2 cup apple cider vinegar, 1/4 cup ketchup, 1/4 cup soy sauce, 1/2 cup water, 1 tsp garlic minced

Steps:

  1. In a large bowl, whisk sauce ingredients until well blended.
  2. In a separate bowl, season turkey with salt and pepper. Add cornstarch and eggs. Mix until turkey is coated with egg and cornstarch batter.
  3. Heat olive oil in large skillet and cook turkey until it is golden brown, usually 4-5 minutes.
  4. Put turkey in crockpot and cover with the sauce. Stir evenly until turkey is coated.
  5. Cook 3 hours on high or 6 hours on low. Serve over warm rice or noodles.

13th Way: Cashew Turkey Stir-fry

Ingredients: 1 lb. turkey breast sliced into thin strips, 1 clove garlic minced, 1/2 lb. sliced mushrooms, 1 medium green pepper sliced, 1 cup carrots thinly sliced, 1/4 cup soy sauce, 1 tsp. granulated sugar, 1 Tblsp cornstarch, 1 cup chicken broth, 4 Tblsp vegetable oil, 3 scallions sliced, hot cooked rice, 3/4 cup cashew nuts

Steps:

  1. In small bowl, mix soy sauce, sugar, cornstarch, and chicken broth. Set aside.
  2. Heat oil in large skillet. Cook turkey in oil until done.
  3. Add garlic, green peppers, mushrooms, carrots, and scallions and cook for 2 minutes. Stir frequently to keep from uneven cooking.
  4. Lower heat and stir in sauce. Cook until sauce thickens.
  5. Serve over hot cooked rice. Sprinkle with cashew nuts.

***I like to add my cashews before plating. Having a little extra sauce on the cashews is extra yummy.

14th Way: Apricot Turkey

Ingredients: 2 lb. turkey breast sliced 1 – 2 inches thick, 1 – 10 oz. jar of apricot preserves, 1 bottle Russian dressing, 1 package instant Onion Soup Mix, 1/4 cup flour

Steps:

  1. Coat turkey breast with flour and place in 9×13 baking dish.
  2. Mix preserves, dressing, and Onion Soup Mix in a small bowl.
  3. Pour preserve mixture over turkey breasts.
  4. Cover with aluminum foil and bake at 350 degrees for 45-55 minutes.
  5. Serve alone or over warm rice.
Continue reading “Turkey 30 Ways – Part #2 (From the Farmer’s Table)”

Absolutely Worth It – Wise Words Wednesday

Will it be easy? Nope. Worth it? Absolutely!

There are two scenarios for this holiday season that come to mind when I think of what’s worthy of effort.

Scenario 1: Putting up Christmas decorations, particularly outdoor lights, is a tough job. It requires precarious positioning of one’s self while attempting to securely attach, mount, or hang the lights in a way that is both esthetically pleasing and able to withstand potential blizzards. Once the lights are in place and any necessary medical attention has been sought, the display of glowing Christmas spirit can warm even the coldest of Grinch hearts.
Was it easy to get those eight pre-lit reindeer with Santa’s sleigh AND the inflatable Snoopy snow globe on the roof? No.
Could you ever imagine the amount of time it would take to assemble your Made-in-China nativity using words that baby Jesus should never have heard? No. But you do it anyway, and it’s worth every watt of energy and effort because you are letting ALL your Christmas lights shine.

Scenario 2: The second scenario of the season is a bit tougher. As our world continues to battle the COVID crisis, I encourage you to envision a holiday where you loosen your hold on what tradition says we MUST do to make Christmas happen.

Will it be easy? Nope. Worth it? Absolutely!

Continue reading “Absolutely Worth It – Wise Words Wednesday”

Monday’s Message – November 30, 2020

2020 has felt like a year that would never end, and yet, I experienced a slight panic realizing today is the last day of November. Where did the year go?

While much of my time has been spent at home, I hope my efforts were impactful outside the boundaries of our family and farm. I volunteer as library lady two afternoons a week at my children’s school and am a lector and song leader at church. In spite of hell and high water, my friends and I work sporadic lunches, happy hours, and lengthy, meme-filled text messages into our chaotic schedules. Making weekly phone calls and sending cards manifests my desire to keep connected with those I love, but I continue to wonder if it’s enough. Do you ever feel the same?

Continue reading “Monday’s Message – November 30, 2020”

Turkey 30 Ways – Part #1 (From the Farmer’s Table)

Living on a turkey farm, we eat a lot of turkey and have gotten pretty creative with preparations of our favorite protein. People often ask for my recipes (especially other turkey farming families), so I decided to share my top 30 ways for preparing turkey.

30 recipes in one post is a bit too much (even for me) to digest. I plan to share these recipes in a series starting off with the simplest and most tried-and-true forms.

Now some of these recipes may not be mind-blowingly, new ideas, but they are ways that my family enjoys turkey. Most are easy recipes that do not require unusual ingredients or too much prep time.

1st Way: Fried Turkey Breast

Ingredients: 1 lb. sliced or cubed turkey breast,  2 tsp. salt, 2 tsp. black pepper, 1/4 cup flour, 2 cups vegetable oil

Steps:
1. Season sliced or cubed turkey with salt and pepper.
2. Toss turkey in flour until fully coated.
3. Heat vegetable oil in non-stick pan 350° F.
4. Place coated turkey into hot oil, flip every 2-3 minutes until completely brown or until juices run clear from meat. Avoid over-cooking or turkey will be dry.

2nd Way: Grilled Turkey Breast

Ingredients: turkey breast sliced 1/2″ to 1″ in thickness, marinade or desired seasoning

Steps:
1. Set uncooked turkey in marinade overnight (if possible). If overnight isn’t an option, allow turkey to marinade or be seasoned for as long as possible before placing on the grill.
2. Heat grill to 350-400° F. Lightly grease grill surface and add marinated/seasoned turkey.
3. Close lid and cook 8 minutes, or until bottoms are browned with sear marks.
4. Rotate turkey and close lid
5. Reduce heat to medium and cook 7-10 minutes more, or until internal temperature reaches 165° F.

*Our favorite marinades are Italian dressing or Lawry’s Hawaiian marinade.

3rd Way: Turkey Ka-bobs

Ingredients: turkey breast cubed 1″ to 1 1/2″ squares, marinade or seasoning, skewers (metal or wooden), mushrooms, baby tomatoes, diced bell peppers, pineapple chunks, onion slices, pretty much any vegetable or meat that you like on a ka-bob.

Steps:
1. Set uncooked turkey in marinade overnight (if possible). If overnight isn’t an option, allow turkey to marinade or be seasoned for as long as possible before placing on the grill.
2. Assemble ka-bobs by alternately adding turkey and vegetables or other marinated meats (beef, lamb, shrimp, etc.) to the skewers *If using wooden skewers, soak skewers in water for an hour before adding meat and veggies.*
3. Heat grill to 350-400° F. Lightly grease grill surface and add ka-bobs.
4. Rotate ka-bobs every 2-3 minutes and close lid.
5. Cook for 6-10 minutes until turkey is cooked through
***Adding additional meats will impact the cooking time***

Continue reading “Turkey 30 Ways – Part #1 (From the Farmer’s Table)”

Joy: The Best Habit

“Talking about our problems is our greatest addiction. Break the habit. Talk about your joys.”

Holding in the things that bother us and keeping big problems to ourselves can be detrimental to our health and relationships. A constant spewing of our issues can also cause others to be desensitized to our downfalls. On the other hand, shedding light on what makes us shine brightens the world around us. Tooting our own horns is a healthy way to say “Woohoo!” when we do something great, but can make us come across as cocky. We have to find a balance between what makes us rant and what makes us rave.

As we enter a holiday season unlike any we’ve experienced, let’s take stock of all that is good and worthy of appreciation. Celebrate the talents and skills that make us successful and unique. Set our weaknesses and shortcomings aside. (You are probably the only one who notices these anyway.) Quit throwing pity parties and start throwing “I’m a Bad Ass” bashes.

Continue reading “Joy: The Best Habit”